Articles

Projects walkthroughs, tool teardowns, interviews, and more.

Features

  1. NICAR When You’re Not New Anymore

    By Andrew Nguyen

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    When you’re no longer new to NICAR, it’s time to start mentoring and collaborating with students and newsrooms who need your help. Here’s one perspective on making the jump from newbie to veteran.

  2. How I Learned to NICAR

    By Kristin Hussey

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    What NICAR 2017 looked like through the eyes of a longtime freelance reporter who needed more data skills.

  3. To NICAR, With Love

    By Lo Bénichou

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    I am queer. I am a women. I am Jewish. I am mixed. And I work in the news in Trump’s America.

  4. Five Tips to Make the Most of NICAR

    By Stephanie Lamm

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    The Computer Assisted Reporting conference brings together digital, data-driven journalists from all over the world.

  5. Grabbing Government Data Before It’s Destroyed

    By Dan Phiffer

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    Last Saturday morning, over 200 scientists, programmers, librarians, artists, students, and academics gathered for Data Rescue NYC to help archive at-risk scientific datasets. The event was the latest in a multi-city series organized by the Environmental Data and Governance Initiative (EDGI), an international collaboration run by non-profits and academics working to support environmental government agencies.

  6. Building a Guide to Open-Sourcing Newsroom Code, Together

    By Lindsay Muscato

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    This week, eleven contributors gathered with us in Washington, D.C. to work on a new resource—a playbook for open-sourcing newsroom code. Together we hoped to tackle a question that’s come up again and again: how to help more newsrooms produce open-source projects, so that everyone can spend more time on great journalism instead of re-creating common tools, tech, and datasets from scratch.

  7. Practical Tips for Improving Mental Health in the Newsroom

    By Joel Eastwood

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    Every year, roughly one in five American adults experiences a mental illness. Working in a newsroom poses particular challenges to mental health: the job typically involves a high-stress environment, long hours, tight deadlines, exposure to graphic images and videos, and an unstable industry with uncertain benefits and job security. This July in Portland at SRCCON, dozens of journalists, developers and newsroom workers sat down together to share their personal experiences with mental health.

  8. Peer Reviewing Our Data Stories

    By Ariana Giorgi and Christine Zhang

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    As journalists who analyze data for stories, we strive to hold ourselves accountable to a high standard of accuracy. But checking our work is rarely a straightforward process. Newsroom editors and fact-checkers might not have enough data expertise. Often, we need an outside opinion. Ideally, we could ask each other for advice, or even turn to experts in other fields for help.

  9. Designing News Apps for Humanity

    By Thomas Wilburn

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    Reader trust is fragile and easily betrayed, and competition is fierce. Newsrooms can’t afford to ignore the way our work affects our readers when their contexts conflict with our expectations.

  10. When They Don’t Want You To Lead

    By Emily Chow and Kaeti Hinck

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    It’s challenging to find your feet as a leader, even more so when you’re in an underrepresented group. For people of color, women and other underrepresented groups, there are structural systems and power dynamics in place that make navigating the workplace—and leadership—especially precarious. During SRCCON in Portland, we gathered to talk about our experiences and ideas for how to navigate shared challenges.

  11. Hello from SRCCON 2016

    By

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    Source is in Portland this week for SRCCON 2016. Here’s how you can follow along with us.

  12. Welcome to Botweek 2016

    By

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    Today kicks off the third annual Source Botweek, our yearly push to document the newsgathering bots, Slackbots, Twitter bots, and other automated creations that have emerged from newsrooms in the last year—and to check out a few extras from the makers of less practical/more adorable bots.

  13. 5 Things I Learned at AAJA’s iCON (and a Few Things I’m Still Considering)

    By Emma Carew Grovum

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    Reflections on iCON, the Asian American Journalists Association’s event in Miami last month.

  14. Beyond “Be Like Facebook”

    By David Sleight

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    The SND judges’ controversial decision to give Facebook its “World’s Best Designed” award in digital—and the resulting unease in the journalism world—points to larger questions in our relationship with third-party platforms and our understanding of the scope of “design.”

  15. Data Journalism Problems in Europe

    By Zara Rahman

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    Zara Rahman reports back on surprising insights from the International Journalism Festival in Perugia.

  16. Return of the Code Convenings: Elections and Updates

    By Erin Kissane

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    Earlier this month, we held our third-ever OpenNews Code Convening, and our first one west of Portland, Oregon. Code Convenings are short events that bring together pairs of developers from news organizations to finish, document, and release open source projects they’ve been chipping away at.

  17. CrowData Grows Up

    By Florencia Coelho and Gabriela Rodriguez

    Posted on

    A La Nación hackathon to enhance the open-source file-freeing tool behind VozData results in a better CrowData and a tall list of changes to come.

  18. SRCCON: How Not to Skew Data with Statistics

    By Kio Stark

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    Notes from a lively SRCCON discussion on tricks for avoiding error, led by Aurelia Moser and Chris Keller.

  19. SRCCON: Human-Driven Design

    By Kio Stark

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    Ryan Pitts and Sara Schnadt on how to know your users and build just what they need.

  20. The Great SRCCON Brain Dump

    By Erin Kissane

    Posted on

    SRCCON, the first-ever OpenNews conference, wrapped up last Friday night at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia. As Quartz’s Nikhil Sonnad notes in his wrap-up post, the problem with even the most energetic and inspiring conference is that the motivation found often fades when everyone returns to the daily hustle and sprint. Like Sonnad, we’re confident that the news-code community that showed up in force at SRCCON has the stamina and sustained interest to maintain the momentum that built up in sessions and around the coffee-hacking stations, and we want to help with that as much as possible. We also want to scoop up as much of the energy and intensity and brain-sharing from SRCCON as we can and pour it out into the wider world that couldn’t fit into the physical conference itself.

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