Articles

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  1. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: The Key to Inclusive, Effective Teams Is Psychological Safety

    By Alan Henry

    Posted on

    To build teams where everyone feels represented and respected, create an environment where we all can bring our whole selves.

  2. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: How to give your interns a leg up in their next job search

    By Emma Carew Grovum

    Posted on

    Not every internship is going to end with a job offer. Here’s how you can give your interns a boost as they enter the job market.

  3. Story Recipe: Exploring Census microdata about your county

    By Rebecca Tippett

    Posted on

    We recently received a request from a resident in Lincoln County, asking for assistance in locating data related to digital inclusion, in order to help enroll residents who qualify for the FCC Emergency Broadband Benefit. Information that can answer this question is collected by the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey—the summary tables provide details on household computer availability and internet subscriptions, poverty status at various levels of the federal poverty line, and SNAP receipt. What the tables don’t provide is the intersection of these characteristics. To answer this, we need the microdata or individual record data. Here’s how we went about answering this question.

  4. Q&As and takeaways: Reporting on corporate landlords

    By Tyler Dukes

    Posted on

    Highlights from a recent community call conversation.

  5. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: Smart leaders put empathy and equity at the forefront of work

    By Irving Washington

    Posted on

    New frameworks for leaders must help them develop a more equitable mindset that shares power and accountability.

  6. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: Leadership and management are not the same thing

    By P. Kim Bui

    Posted on

    Newsrooms must create ways for people to learn to lead without pushing people into management.

  7. What we learned from a year of Exit Interviews

    By Ryan Pitts

    Posted on

    OpenNews events and programs have always welcomed honest talk about careers, identity, and our sense of belonging in an industry that often isn’t kind to workers. This series was another way to convene a community-wide conversation about our newsrooms and what it would take to make them better.

  8. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: Leaders, you need to make room or move out

    By Robert Hernandez

    Posted on

    Going beyond a seat at the table for journalists of color.

  9. A starter pack of accessibility resources

    By Aditi Bhandari

    Posted on

    If you’re new to accessible design, it may feel daunting to think of the work that lies ahead of you, but everyone in this field had to start somewhere. Once I realised accessibility was a baseline and not a ceiling, making my work more inclusive became an integral part of my workflow rather than an extra task between me and the publish button.

  10. Why web accessibility matters to me

    By Aditi Bhandari

    Posted on

    When I first found out that there were things I needed to fix to make my work in journalism more accessible, I went about it the same way I learned to code: going with the solution that appears most commonly among search results. I’ve spent the past year trying to course-correct by making an active effort to learn more.

  11. One easy way to make conference ticket prices more equitable, and bring in more money

    By Erika Owens

    Posted on

    Consider giving people multiple options instead of just one ticket price.

  12. Stop making people prove they need a free ticket to events

    By Erika Owens

    Posted on

    You can make free tickets easier for everyone with one simple change.

  13. How we improved the engineering internship recruitment process at The Washington Post

    By Holden Foreman and Emily Liu

    Posted on

    Internships can be a great opportunity for students to gain professional experience and for employees to mentor the next generation of engineers, but news organizations that aren’t careful and intentional when recruiting can risk inadvertently over-indexing on candidates with the most access to time, money, and social connections. Since our team loves finding ways to make our processes better, we decided to examine our internship hiring process and see where we could make improvements.

  14. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: Everyone can help close the wage gap for journalists of color

    By Emma Carew Grovum

    Posted on

    You don’t have to tell EVERYONE how much money you currently or have made in order to participate in salary transparency.

  15. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: Onboarding isn’t just for early career staff

    By Jahna Berry

    Posted on

    Here’s how you can help new BIPOC managers and experienced hires succeed.

  16. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: There is no pipeline problem

    By Robert Hernandez

    Posted on

    A problem exists in how the industry treats historically marginalized journalists in the hiring process.

  17. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: Let’s learn without fear of failure

    By Annemarie Dooling

    Posted on

    Personal growth is imperative to professional and organizational growth.

  18. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: It’s time to own our biases

    By Julia B. Chan

    Posted on

    This year, I’m committing to create journalism that reflects and honors the experiences of people in the newsroom — and outside

  19. How to write effective alt text, for journalists

    By Patrick Garvin

    Posted on

    For journalists wanting to make their work accessible to people with disabilities, alt text is a great place to start. This short guide can help you think about how to add helpful alt text to images, charts & data visualizations, and social media posts for your newsroom.

  20. Setting boundaries so working on DEI doesn’t overwhelm my life

    By Sisi Wei

    Posted on

    When working on diversity isn’t really a choice, what can we do to make sure we’re giving ourselves time to heal?

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