Articles

Projects walkthroughs, tool teardowns, interviews, and more.

  1. How We Made Nu Source

    By Erin Kissane and Ryan Pitts

    Posted on

    How our small team redesigned Source, with a design refresh and a new navigation and structure that matches the way we publish now.

  2. Things You Made, Feb 21

    By Erin Kissane and Lindsay Muscato

    Posted on

    We’ve returned from roundup hiatus with a new website, a new OpenNews, a bunch of great columnists and new writers, and the another batch of excellent new things you made.

  3. Event Roundup, Feb 21

    By Erika Owens

    Posted on

    Meetups and Misinfocon in the week before NICAR.

  4. Tracking Vermont’s Cabinet Votes, the Hands-Free Way

    By Sara Simon

    Posted on

    Little Vermont’s been in the limelight lately—C-SPAN style. Between Sen. Bernie Sanders, now more well-known now than ever, and Sen. Patrick Leahy, the senior-most member of the Senate Judiciary committee, my team here at Vermont Public Radio knew that the new administration’s cabinet nomination process would be of key interest our audience. We knew we wanted to track our senators’ roles throughout.

  5. Playing with Suspense in Data Visualizations

    By Lam Thuy Vo

    Posted on

    For a recent story about how Washington Post editor Doris Truong became the center of a partisan online flame war, we wanted to illustrate what happens when a person becomes part of viral false story and subject to online trolling.

  6. You Talking to Me?

    By Stacy-Marie Ishmael

    Posted on

    From BuzzFeed’s BuzzBot, an emoji-heavy offering designed to deliver updates about the Democratic and Republican National Conventions to CNN’s more traditional approach, news bots were suddenly everywhere. And then they weren’t.

  7. Building an Annotation Tool on a Dime

    By Kavya Sukumar

    Posted on

    Shortly after President Trump’s inauguration, Vox published the inuagural address with annotations from Vox’s policy writers.

  8. Grabbing Government Data Before It’s Destroyed

    By Dan Phiffer

    Posted on

    Last Saturday morning, over 200 scientists, programmers, librarians, artists, students, and academics gathered for Data Rescue NYC to help archive at-risk scientific datasets. The event was the latest in a multi-city series organized by the Environmental Data and Governance Initiative (EDGI), an international collaboration run by non-profits and academics working to support environmental government agencies.

  9. Event Roundup, Feb 13

    By Erika Owens

    Posted on

    Journalism-code meetups around the world, plus a bunch of upcoming deadlines.

  10. Opening Secure Channels for Confidential Tips

    By Martin Shelton

    Posted on

    To make it easier for tipsters to share sensitive information, a growing number of news organizations are launching resources for confidential tips. This short guide will describe some basics around how to think about security on behalf of your sources before thinking about tools and practices.

  11. Hello Again

    By Erin Kissane

    Posted on

    Source is published by OpenNews, a project incubated at Mozilla and funded by the Knight Foundation to support and strengthen the community working on open technologies and processes in journalism. As of today, OpenNews is independent, working as a project of Community Partners, a nonprofit fiscal sponsor. You can read about our new setup and the programs and events we’ll be offering—and get the just-released dates and location for SRCCON 2017—at our blog.

  12. Event Roundup, Jan 30

    By Erika Owens

    Posted on

    Deadlines this week for some major journalism fellowships, plus a bunch of upcoming events.

  13. Notes on Working with Big-ish Data

    By Mike Stucka

    Posted on

    I finished a project with a home-built table that was about 16GB, some 60 million rows by 110ish fields. It was…big. Sometimes it was painful. Mostly, though, it worked out, and it got us what I think is a damned good story. Anyway, I think it was Ben Welsh who’d observed something like: We have some good tools to work with Big Data, but not great tools for data that’s not quite so big. I ran into that situation.

  14. Same Diff: Tracking Trump’s People

    By David Yanofsky

    Posted on

    Welcome! This is the first of an occasional series of posts I’ll be writing here about how news organizations around the world are going about the same things differently. The plan is to focus on the kind of work that doesn’t fit neatly into our CMSes, or that need custom design or code. I’ve been doing this work for seven years and remain to be fascinated by the varying approaches to the same subject matter. When news breaks, (or perhaps when news is planned 12 months ahead) how do we in media make the same things, differently?

  15. Visually Speaking: Patterns for Humane Data Visualization

    By Dana Amihere

    Posted on

    Data can be impersonal, especially large datasets with thousands or even millions of records. The fact that most data of this magnitude is calculated by machines is, however, a sharp contrast to the ultimate goal of examining it in the first place—to find human trends and patterns behind the numbers.

  16. How We Made “Rewind the Red Planet”

    By Brian Jacobs

    Posted on

    The mini-series Mars, that aired on the National Geographic Channel in November 2016, imagined what it would be like to live on Mars in the near future. For the interactive narrative Rewind the Red Planet, we endeavored to show Mars as it was before it was a red desert, back to a time when liquid water may have run freely, between three and four billion years ago. We wanted to allow readers to see ancient Mars in its entirety from a planetary scale, how it may have featured a vast northern ocean, or may have had water trapped in expansive glaciers.

  17. Introducing autoEdit: Video Editing Made Better

    By Pietro Passarelli

    Posted on

    A new Mac OS X desktop app, autoEdit, creates automatic transcription from a video or audio file. The user can then make text selections and export those selections as a video sequence, in the editing software of their choice.

  18. Event Roundup, Jan 17

    By Erika Owens

    Posted on

    Data journalism training in Berlin, plus a bunch of upcoming meetups around the world.

  19. Event Roundup, Jan 9

    By Erika Owens

    Posted on

    OpenNews wants to help you get to events, plus meetups later this month.

  20. How The Chicago Reporter Made ‘Settling for Misconduct’

    By Matt Kiefer and Julia Smith

    Posted on

    In researching Settling for Misconduct, we had to account for details from hundreds of county and federal court filings, identify thousands of officers named in civil complaints and tally hundreds of millions of dollars in monetary awards. We also needed thorough reporting to connect issues of police misconduct to fiscal accountability. And oh yeah – we had to have a slick web app to present the data to the public.

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