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  1. Stop making people prove they need a free ticket to events

    By Erika Owens

    Posted on

    You can make free tickets easier for everyone with one simple change.

  2. How we improved the engineering internship recruitment process at The Washington Post

    By Holden Foreman and Emily Liu

    Posted on

    Internships can be a great opportunity for students to gain professional experience and for employees to mentor the next generation of engineers, but news organizations that aren’t careful and intentional when recruiting can risk inadvertently over-indexing on candidates with the most access to time, money, and social connections. Since our team loves finding ways to make our processes better, we decided to examine our internship hiring process and see where we could make improvements.

  3. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: Everyone can help close the wage gap for journalists of color

    By Emma Carew Grovum

    Posted on

    You don’t have to tell EVERYONE how much money you currently or have made in order to participate in salary transparency.

  4. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: Onboarding isn’t just for early career staff

    By Jahna Berry

    Posted on

    Here’s how you can help new BIPOC managers and experienced hires succeed.

  5. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: There is no pipeline problem

    By Robert Hernandez

    Posted on

    A problem exists in how the industry treats historically marginalized journalists in the hiring process.

  6. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: Let’s learn without fear of failure

    By Annemarie Dooling

    Posted on

    Personal growth is imperative to professional and organizational growth.

  7. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: It’s time to own our biases

    By Julia B. Chan

    Posted on

    This year, I’m committing to create journalism that reflects and honors the experiences of people in the newsroom — and outside

  8. How to write effective alt text, for journalists

    By Patrick Garvin

    Posted on

    For journalists wanting to make their work accessible to people with disabilities, alt text is a great place to start. This short guide can help you think about how to add helpful alt text to images, charts & data visualizations, and social media posts for your newsroom.

  9. Setting boundaries so working on DEI doesn’t overwhelm my life

    By Sisi Wei

    Posted on

    When working on diversity isn’t really a choice, what can we do to make sure we’re giving ourselves time to heal?

  10. Journalists: If you’ve worked with others to change your newsroom, you’re probably an organizer

    By Sisi Wei

    Posted on

    Three lessons I’ve learned about journalism, organizing, and how closely intertwined they are.

  11. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: This is my commitment as an ally and a leader

    By Greg Burton

    Posted on

    There’s much work to be done to better support and develop journalists of color. Here are a few steps I’m taking this year.

  12. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: U.S.-focused Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Strategies Don’t Scale Globally

    By Feli Carrique

    Posted on

    The push towards DEI initiatives in US media is a great thing, and it can help raise analog concerns in places where there hasn’t been so much reckoning. However, assuming that the same initiatives implemented to deal with discrimination in the US. are applicable elsewhere is inaccurate and short-sighted.

  13. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: A self-improvement buddy system for leaders

    By John Davidow and Hannah Wise

    Posted on

    Hannah Wise and John Davidow, co-founders of Media Bridge Partners (a new consultancy that helps media organizations with their diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging goals), discuss their personal/professional commitments for 2022.

  14. Three edits you can bring to every story to make disability visible in news

    By Hannah Wise

    Posted on

    Newsrooms are starting to understand they need to make accessibility more than an afterthought. Editors are positioned to propel much needed change — even one story at a time.

  15. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: What we’ll do in 2022

    By P. Kim Bui and Emma Carew Grovum

    Posted on

    Over the next few weeks, you’ll see a series of guest columns that are a little different than our usual offering. As promised, we solicited and received commitments (not predictions) from journalism leaders. We’re excited to publish these thoughts and promises made by our fellow leaders, allies, and rebels — of all colors.

  16. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: Dual managers and caretakers face additional challenges

    By Kyndell Harkness

    Posted on

    Managing as a person of color has its own burden when dealing with the dynamics of the workplace. Often overlooked, is the extra weight of culturally based family obligations that are a part of our daily lives.

  17. Community Q&A: As a white manager, how do I build trust and be a good ally to my colleagues of color?

    By Members of the DEI Coalition

    Posted on

    DEI Coalition members talk about allyship in practice, acknowledging power dynamics, and building trust

  18. Sincerely, Leaders of Color: We’re back and better than ever

    By P. Kim Bui and Emma Carew Grovum

    Posted on

    We’ve been funded for 2022! Newsroom leaders: We want to hear what you’re *actually* going to do next year to help journalists of color thrive.

  19. Guidelines for reporting on multiracial people

    By Caitlin Gilbert, Jasmine Mithani, Lakshmi Sarah, and Kaitlyn Wells

    Posted on

    PART 2 OF 2: When it comes to writing about mixed and multiracial people, it is critical to understand the historical context behind the terms, learn how to speak to sources and write about them, and examine any bias throughout the journalistic process. In this article, we are going to introduce guidelines for reporting on mixed-race populations.

  20. A condensed history of multiracial identification in the United States

    By Caitlin Gilbert, Jasmine Mithani, Lakshmi Sarah, and Kaitlyn Wells

    Posted on

    PART 1 OF 2: When it comes to writing about mixed and multiracial people, it is critical to understand the historical context behind the terms, learn how to speak to sources and write about them, and examine any bias throughout the journalistic process. In this article, we are going to review an abbreviated history of mixed-race people in the United States.

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